Ironically, I fit well into the cookie cutter public education system, or at least I learnt to. I thrived when projects were hands on and found ways to make frivolous projects meaningful for me.

Growing up as a child with a home daycare, I had the opportunity to observe many different types of children with different interests and ways of learning. My mom allowed me to take initiatives, take risks and get dirty.

In my teens I got the chance to be part of the International Baccalaureate program at a public school. This meant I got the chance to do many hands on and integrated projects. The most memorable project was my final personal project: organizing, creating and teaching children’s dance classes as well as organizing and planning the dance recital. In my late teens I left on one of the most life changing experiences: Katimavik. I starting seeing how valuable personal learning was and how much I could do when I was passionate.

Through my early adulthood many other experiences contributed to my current view of education. Formally I got a DEC in Child Studies where I had the chance to make sense of many of the things I had seen in my own experience with children. During my Leisure Sciences degree I continued to see how crucial curiosity and play is for learning. But the informal education that I got during these years was just as valuable. I saw tremendous learning happening in the forest through my work at an outdoor activity centre. I got to see children explore and develop their social skills while working at a sports camp. I played with plants and gardens, expanding my understanding of the world. I spent a year abroad learning about a new place, meeting new people and problem solving.  All these experiences led me to see the potential that such environments can have for authentic learning.

In the last two years I founded Racine Carrée, an experiential learning hub that brings together university and primary school students to design and implement real world solutions for existing needs.

And this year I embark on a Learning Trek to see what educational possibilities already exist in the world around me…